Precious Jesus

"Afresh, precious, precious Jesus, I resign this body to You, for doing or suffering, for living or dying. Will You accept it? Will You use me for Your glory more than heretofore, that You may have some little return for all the benefits You have done to me? Oh, do grant this request; my heart longs for it, my spirit pleads for it; and "if You will, You can." You know the hot temptation of which I am the subject. Bring Your glory out of it, and keep me from the evil, and it shall be well." - Ruth Bryan

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

If only we labored and struggled after this manner

A story is told of an old man, who lived long ago; forcible was the way in which he spoke of the struggles he had to carry on.
A friend asked him the cause of his struggles, since in the evening he so often had great weariness and pain. "Alas," answered he, "I have every day so much to do; I have . . .
two falcons to tame,
two hares to keep from running away,
two hawks to manage,
a serpent to confine,
a lion to chain, and
a sick man to tend and wait upon."
"Why, this is only folly," said the friend, "no man has all these things to do at once."
"Yet indeed," he answered, "it is with me as I have said.
The two falcons are my two eyes, which I must diligently guard, lest something should please them which may be hurtful to my salvation.
The two hares are my feet, which I must hold back, lest they should run after evil objects, and walk in the ways of sin.
The two hawks are my two hands, which I must train and keep to work, in order that I may be able to provide for myself and for my brethren who are in need.
The serpent is my tongue, which I must always keep in with a bridle, lest it should speak anything unseemly.
The lion is my heart, with which I have to maintain a continual fight, in order that vanity and pride may not fill it, but that the grace of God may dwell and work there.
The sick man is my own body, which is ever needing my watchfulness and care. All this daily wears out my strength."
The friend listened with wonder, and then said, "Dear brother, if all men labored and struggled after this manner, the times would be better, and more according to the will of God."

from George Everard's 'Daily Warfare'

No comments: